HIS - History

Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Graduate Courses in History (HIS)

http://history.appstate.edu

James Goff, Department Chair

HIS 5000. Varieties and Methodologies of History (3).F. An introduction to the study of history at the graduate level, with attention to the history of the discipline, important theoretical and methodological debates in the field, and examination of methods of research practiced in historical sub-disciplines. Required of all History graduate students in their first year of study.

HIS 5002. Seminar in Public History (3).On Demand. The course provides an introduction to and consideration of the major methodological and theoretical approaches to the primary sectors of Public History, including archives and records management, historical interpretation and preservation, historical editing and publishing.

HIS 5106. Readings Seminar in European History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of European history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.

HIS 5107. Research Seminar in European History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of European history, and methodological problems and issues.

HIS 5206. Readings Seminar in American History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of American history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.

HIS 5207. Research Seminar in American History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of American history, and methodological problems and issues.

HIS 5208. Readings Seminar in Appalachian History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of Appalachian history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.

HIS 5209. Research Seminar in Appalachian History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of Appalachian history, and methodological problems and issues.

HIS 5306. Readings Seminar in Latin American History (3).On Demand. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the area of Latin American history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.

HIS 5307. Research Seminar in Latin American History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the field of Latin American history, and methodological problems and issues.

HIS 5400. Grant Writing (3).F.Even-numbered years. This is a course tailored for advanced humanities and social science students who would find grant development skills useful for their careers--as well as to enhance their C.V.s. The course introduces various categories of external funding (e.g., grants, fellowships, contracts) and funders (e.g., public, nonprofit, private) and the advantages and disadvantages of these categories of funding. It introduces search strategies and the option of combining several funding sources to support projects. It deals with communication with program officers, emphasizes writing to program guidelines and for reviewers, and introduces the basics of budget development. The main assessed work for the course is a grant proposal, written to mock or real guidelines, requesting support for a research, programming, or service project.

HIS 5406. Readings Seminar in African/Middle Eastern/Asian History (3).On Demand. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Course will emphasize significant fields of historical study in the areas of African, Middle Eastern, or Asian history. Strong emphasis will be placed on current scholarship and bibliography.

HIS 5407. Research Seminar in African/Middle Eastern/Asian History (3).F;S. Variable content. Barring duplication, a student may repeat the course. Seminars will give students practical experience in examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources, with emphasis on defining the topic to be researched, assessing its significance within the fields of African, Middle Eastern, or Asian history, and methodological problems and issues.

HIS 5450. History and Social Studies Education (3).S. HIS 5450 is the capstone course for the Master of Arts degree in History, Education with a concentration in Secondary School Teaching. Participants complete the Product of Learning requirement, which is presented to a board of university and public school professionals. Assignments include the examination of research on instruction in history and social studies, the development of an action research project to be implemented in a classroom setting, and the performance of evaluative reflection on the program as a whole.

HIS 5460. World History: Concepts and Content (3).On Demand. Reading seminar is designed to introduce students to the important theories, themes, concepts and methods in the field of world history.

HIS 5500. Independent Study (1-3).F;S.

HIS 5530-5549. Selected Topics (1-4).On Demand.

HIS 5575. Introduction to Public History (3).F. This course explores major fields and contemporary issues within public history, such as oral history, museum interpretation, historic preservation and sustainable development, new media, material culture, and controversy in public history. The course will also investigate the contested relationship between the practice of public history and changing ideas about historical memory, identity, power, and ethics. Through readings and papers, occasional field trips and/or guest speakers, and/or team projects, graduate students will build upon their prior experience with public history, with an eye towards preparing for the job market.

HIS 5576. Cultural Resource Management (3).S. Cultural Resource Management (CRM) is integral to the fields of historic preservation, cultural site management, and public history. Areas of study include environmental review law, CRM business practices, and the management, preservation, and conservation of cultural resources, including historical and archaeological sites. Effective stewardship of culturally significant properties is a major focus of this course. A grounding in current CRM practices is provided including laws and procedures enacted to protect and preserve these resources. Effective methods of site management, facilities operations/funding and CRM project management are covered.

HIS 5577. Historical Documentation (3).S.Even-numbered years. Historical documentation teaches the formal recording of the history and physical characteristics of historic sites, structures and buildings required for preservation, planning and environmental mitigation. Skills utilized by public historians and cultural resources specialists, including local history research, historical context, photographic documentation, mapping and spatial analysis techniques are included. Students will use a range of these skills in completing a service project.

HIS 5578. Architectural History (3).S.Odd-numbered years. A foundation in architectural history is an essential component of public history and cultural resource management education. The course will cover the evolution of architecture from early indigenous habitats and early American vernacular buildings to modern architectural styles. This is useful course for managers, interpreters, and documenters of historic and historic archaeological sites. The course will include a preservation project.

HIS 5579. Oral History (3).F.Odd-numbered years. A survey of the history, philosophy and techniques of recovering and developing primary historical source materials by means of carefully interviewing, recording and converting the memories of selected individuals into history. The course focus is primarily on U.S. history but can include topics and issues from other countries. The class format is discussion with some lectures and documentary films. The course will teach skills such as interview transcriptions from audio-tape, background research, and oral history interviews.

HIS 5580. Studies in Material Culture (3).S.Even-numbered years. This course provides a broad introduction to the multidisciplinary field of material culture studies. The course introduces ways of looking at and learning from objects and examines how practitioners from a variety of disciplines have approached the study of material culture.

HIS 5581. Records and Society (3).S. The history of archival management and its evolution into the digital age is essential to the understanding and use of archival systems. Types of archives and records encountered by historians in the course of their research will be discussed. The evolution of the methodology behind the development of archival collections will be included. Different media utilized from ancient times to the present will be examined in light of the preservation and collection problems they present for the archivist or researcher. This course is designed to provide a fuller understanding of the history and evolution of historical archives and collections.

HIS 5583. American Environmental History (3).On Demand. An overview of Americans' interaction with the natural world from colonization to the present. Emphasis on: Native Americans' relationship to the land; the environmental effects of European settlement; the growth of agriculture and industry; conservation and preservation; atomic energy; chemical pesticides, and the modern environmental movement. The course is of particular interest to public historians, cultural resource managers, planners and environmental specialists.

HIS 5584. America's National Parks (3).On Demand. A survey of the history of America's national parks from the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis on: Americans' changing ideas about wilderness preservation, the early history of Yosemite and Yellowstone, the role of railroads in park promotion, removal of Native Americans and white settlers from park sites, establishment of the National Park Service, the impact of the automobile on tourism, the creation of national parks in the eastern U.S., wildlife policy, overcrowding and other problems facing the parks.

HIS 5586. Introduction to Historic Preservation (3).F.Even-numbered years. Historic preservation is the identification, protection, and enhancement of historic resources. This course covers the history of preservation in the United States. In particular, students will study the evolution of the federal preservation programs along with the methodology and requirements of the National Register of Historic Places. The course introduces current programs and techniques utilized for the preservation of historic buildings, landscapes, and sites. Students will learn about governmental, non-profit, and for-profit organizations involved in historic preservation and their importance in determining the direction of the field. The course includes a practical component.

HIS 5587. Philosophy of Historic Preservation (3).F.Odd-numbered years. A graduate course on historic preservation in which the class will explore different approaches to preservation. We will consider aspects of the history, philosophy, and practice of preservation in order to contribute to professional development. We will look in- depth at contemporary themes in preservation. These may include adaptive reuse, heritage tourism, cultural landscapes, and/or new directions in the field. Students will complete an appropriate project.

HIS 5591. Archives, History, and Collective Memory (3).S.Odd-numbered years. This course will examine the relationship between history and archives with a focus on the impact these disciplines have on the construction of collective memory. Students in this course will consider such historical and archival issues as the process of memory construction, public history display, commemoration, the writing of history, and the formulation of political and national identities through the lens of the archival record. The class will consider the use or misuse of archives to shape political or social myths and the use of documents to influence a shared historical consciousness.

HIS 5595. Digital History (3).S.Even-numbered years. This course prepares students to use and understand a wide variety of current and emerging digital technologies in the service of doing history. In addition to learning about these technologies, students will also consider their usefulness, the differences in input and output technologies for historians, and what constitutes digital history. Students will complete one or more digital projects.

HIS 5610. Management of Museums (3).S.Odd-numbered years. This course surveys the history of museum development internationally, and components of modern museum operation. Major topics include the world history of museums, the development of core management documents, and finance.

HIS 5640. Interpretation in Museums (3).F.Odd-numbered years. This course surveys the manner by which museums create and present exhibits and other programs intended for the public. Topics include the philosophy of exhibits, methods of exhibit design, model making, label writing, development of non-exhibit programming and evaluation.

HIS 5650. Museum Education (3).F.Even-numbered years. An examination of how teaching in museums is achieved through interpretive and education programs. Students will study a variety of museum environments and teaching strategies by engaging in case studies, class discussion, student presentations and field trips. The course will introduce and prepare history, cultural resource management, public history, and education students for the growing field of museum education. Topics covered include museum orientation and interpretation, museum promotion, grant-writing, educational psychology, media and technology and educational outreach.

HIS 5660. Topics in Public and Applied History (3).On Demand. Variable content. A systematic examination of a field in public and applied history such as collections management, living history, or architecture and society. Barring duplication of content, a student may repeat the course.

HIS 5900. Internship in History (3-12).On Demand. Placement in a supervised teaching environment, or other supervised work experience appropriate for history students with instruction and practice of that knowledge in a work environment. Students may be required to reside off campus for the duration of the internship. Graded on an S/U basis.

HIS 5989. Graduate Research (1-9).F;S. This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master's and specialist's levels. Graded on an S/U basis. HIS 5989 does not count toward a degree.

HIS 5998. Thesis Research (1-9).F;S. Students carry out principal research for a thesis topic, meet regularly with a thesis advisor, and revise and defend the thesis prospectus. First half of a two-semester thesis requirement; students must also complete HIS 5999. Graded on an S/U basis.

HIS 5999. Thesis (1-9).F;S. Students participate in monthly meetings of a research colloquium involving all students completing theses. In the meetings, students present their research in successive stages and receive critiques of their written work. Second half of a two-semester thesis requirement; students must first complete HIS 5998. Graded on an SP/UP basis until the thesis has been successfully defended and received final approval, at which time all grades will be changed to S.